Eating cassava and megapode egg cooked in a volcano: this is Savo Island

Frederic Ninizepo cooking  kasava and megapode eggs in the boiling water of the volcano

Frederic Ninizepo cooking kasava and megapode eggs in the boiling water of the volcano

ForĀ Frederic Ninizepo and the 4000 people of Savo, it is a constant threat.

And though it has not erupted since 1854, having a still-active volcano on the island means it is something they have to think about.

In fact, there is an evacuation plan in place in case it erupts.

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But it also brings other benefits.

As Mr Ninizepo, an elder of Bonala Village, explained to an SIBC team visiting the island, the volcano brought in tourists from all over the world.

“They walk up this way (from the south-western side of the volcano) and bring with them food like banana, megapode egg and kasava to cook in the boiling hot water at the peak,” he said.

“But we would like more tourists to come.”

The walk is a challenging one – about two hours up and 90 minutes down – but well-worth the trek.

There is even a hot spring along the way, and cold running water at one point if it all gets too much.

Just watch your feet towards the top, the water is boiling hot.

The SIBC team during the climb to the top of the volcano

The SIBC team during the climb to the top of the volcano

But the benefits of the volcano extend right across the small island.

On the other side of the island, in the village of Kougele, leader Richard Clay said the smaller volcano that serviced their village was just as useful.

The smaller volcano in Kougele village

The smaller volcano in Kougele village

“When people come it helps families with their school fees,” he said. “We can also cook food in the volcano.”

 

 

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